The Law of IT (continued)

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Etudes 1 (Après Ravel: Le Tombeau De Couperin — 1. Prélude)

A fish only exists on the flat screen
a lion only exists in surround sound
an elephant is only real in digital form
although a 3D moulded form can be provided
if they are dying out they have been recorded
of course the smell is absent
but that doesn’t matter
they are not a part of our world
they are not a part of It
the disconnect between animals and It is permanent

Etudes 2 ( Après Debussy: Images #1, L 110 — Hommage A Rameau )

Space is constructed
from flat lined edges in digital Wi-Fi time only
Earth has decided
to wrap itself in plastic (plastique)
Earth has brought It upon itself.
So It must be so.
The laws of science
of how It has all come to be
means only misery
Deep Time has no meaning

Etudes 3 (Après John Coltrane After The Rain)

The first law of It is “more”
The second law of It is It’s never enough
The fourth law of It is out of sight out of mind
The fifth law of It is there is just today
The sixth law of It is there is no consequence
The seventh law of It is worrying is pointless
The eighth law of It is don’t talk about your worries
The ninth law of It is that there are no Laws
The twelfth law of It is that there is no It.

Etudes 4 (Après Arvo Part — Stabat Mater for Choir and String Orchestra)

Earth is burning
my soul is crying
Earth is in flames
and there are not enough tears
to put out the flames
Earth is burning
my heart breaks
but we must defy IT
no more excuses resist


©robcullenfebruary2020Resistance Poetry

Verse as Commentary

Written by

Rob Cullen

Rob Cullen artist, writer, poet. Rob runs “Voices on the Bridge” a poetry initiative in Wales. Walks hills and mountains daily with a sheep dog at his side.

Resistance Poetry

Resistance Poetry

Verse as Commentary

Vertigo

“How often, I thought to myself, had I lain thus in a hotel room, in Vienna  or Frankfurt or Brussels, with my hands clasped under my head, listening not to the stillness, as in Venice, but to the roar of the traffic, with a mounting sense of panic. That then, I thought on such occasions, is the new ocean. Ceaselessly, in great surges, the waves roll in over the length and breadth of our cities, rising higher and higher, breaking in a kind of frenzy when the roar reaches its peak and then discharging across the stones and asphalt even as the next onrush is being released from where it was held by traffic lights. For some time now I have been convinced that is out of this din that the life is being born which will come after us and will spell our gradual destruction, just as we have been gradually destroying what was there long before us.”

 

 

  1. G. Sebald Vertigo. P63